Assessing customer experience is simple

We do a lot of consultancy on customer experience across a range of interaction points, which is a bit of a bullshit bingo way of saying that we do a lot of analysis of documents, websites, brochures, pitches, etc, to see how well information is delivered.

This is important in getting customer experience right because available information is what drives expectations, which is the greatest determinant of how customers rate their experience (more on that here).

We then recommend, design or redesign that information delivery, be that adopting new channels, formats, presentation styles, or just tweaking the odd word. Because ensuring information is accessible, useful and actionable is a big part of how we improve experience and, through the amazing symmetry of customer experience and business outcomes, deliver better results for our clients.

At root the analysis is pretty simple.

We assess whether the result of engaging with what is being provided is likely to be confusion or confidence for the customer. In our experience these two markers are the strongest indicators of whether a negative or positive experience is going to be created.

Though the question at the heart of the assessment is simple there are lots and lots of questions that might need to be asked to confidently answer it.

Can the customer understand what they are being told? Do they understand what they are being asked to do? Do they understand their next action? Do they understand what will happen next? Does the presentation match the context they are in? Does the content reflect their likely emotional state? And on, and on, and on.

If your business can answer yes to these sort of questions then your customer is almost certainly getting good information, will be able to set appropriate expectations and will have a positive experience. If you can’t, then you are going to end up with frustrated, confused, unhappy and potentially angry customers.

Within your business you probably know the answer, it’s just a question you haven’t explicitly been asked before. So ask it, across your business, do your interactions provide confidence or confusion to your customers?

Assessing your customer experience really is that simple. Of course, what you need to do to fix it might not be.


Jay Nicholl

Strategy Director


Write clearly

“I have made this longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter.” Blaise Pascal (1657)

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